CALL FOR PROPOSALS

The 15th Global Legal Skills Conference will be held May 20-22, 2020 hosted by the University of Bari in cooperation with the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law, Arizona State and UIC-John Marshall Law School.

The first round of conference proposals has already closed. Additional proposals are being considered on a space-available basis. The Conference Proposal Form can be found at https://forms.law.asu.edu/view.php?id=659654. Please submit a proposal on any aspect of Global Legal Skills, including experiential learning, distance education, comparative law, international law, course design and materials, teaching methods, and opportunities for teaching abroad and in the United States. Please include information about your institutional affiliations, if any. Because the conference focuses on legal skills for a global audience, please tailor your proposal accordingly.

Proposals should be for a 25-minute presentation (for one or two people), an interactive group panel presentation (no more than four panelists) of 75-minutes (including audience participation), or a round table discussion.

You may submit more than one proposal; but because of high demand for speaking, you will only be allowed to speak on one panel. If more than one proposal is selected, the program committee will contact you on how to proceed.

Most panel presentations will be in English, but proposals in other languages are also welcome. The conference attracts an international audience, and the conference organizers do not believe that global legal skills exist only in English.

Description

The Global Legal Skills Conference focuses on international legal education and essential skills, including legal writing, legal research, legal reasoning, legal English, translations, and advocacy skills. Additional topics include creating appropriate materials and assignments, cross-cultural and intercultural issues, classroom teaching, clinical legal education, academic support, international legal exchanges, and related fields.

The conference audience will include legal writing professionals, international and comparative law professors, clinical professors and others involved in skills education, law school administrators, law librarians, and ESL/EFL professors. Also attending will be faculty members teaching general law subjects with a transnational or international component. Attendees have also included judges, lawyers, court translators, and others involved in international and transnational law. Attendees come from around the world, and as many as 35 countries have been represented in past conferences.

This is a self-funded academic conference, and as in past years, presenters will be asked to pay the Conference registration fee.

The Conference began in Chicago, but it has traveled to Monterrey, Mexico; San Jose, Costa Rica; Verona, Italy, Washington, D.C., Melbourne, Australia, and Phoenix, Arizona. The 2020 conference will mark the third time the conference has been held in Italy—with the University of Bari hosting for its first time.

We invite participation from academics and practitioners from all disciplines and all continents to explore ways that law schools around the world can adjust their curricula to prepare students to engage in the global legal marketplace.